Antigone summary

Koryphaios is the assistant to the King Creon and the leader of the Chorus. Only the Guards are left, and the tragedy does not matter to them. The antistrophe then replies: With his next scene, the playwright introduces Creon, the antagonist of the narrative, entering alongside the chorus of Theban Elders.

The Chorus interrupts and agrees with him. Antigone sits before the First Guard in her cell; his is the last face she will see.

Antigone Summary

The Messenger delivers the news: Antigone sends the Nurse away for coffee. It is clear how he feels about these two values in conflict when encountered in another person, Antigone: He emphasizes that her being the daughter of Oedipus does not put her above the law, and orders Antigone to return to her bed, publically announcing that she had been ill, in an attempt to resolve the situation.

Her dialogues with Ismene reveal her to be as stubborn as her uncle. She recites her letter, "Forgive me, my darling.

In Antigone, the hubris of Creon is revealed.

The Oedipus Trilogy

The prophecy follows a theme of righteousness as it vows to punish Creon for his cruelty and atrocities. When Antigone opposes Creon, her suffering the uncanny, is her supreme action. Historical context[ edit ] Antigone was written at a time of national fervor.

The messenger also reveals that prior to her death, she cursed him for taking away her son. Eurydice will knit until the time comes for her to go to her room and die.

Terrified of persecution, Ismene denies her sister of any aid. A second messenger arrives to tell Creon and the chorus that Eurydice has killed herself.

Creon appears, and the First explains that Antigone was found digging Polynices' grave by hand in broad daylight.

In the next scene, Ismene enters the room and is interrogated by Creon. But Antigone does not sway from her righteousness, saying she would rather die than see Polyneices unburied and left as food for the vultures and that she would only return to doing what she believes in. Even when he is forced to amend his decree to please the gods, he first tends to the dead Polyneices before releasing Antigone.

When Creon threatens to execute Antigone in front of his son, Haemon leaves, vowing never to see Creon again. Creon replies that the mob already knows the truth, and he can do nothing.

Tiresiasthe blind prophet, enters. The Chorus notes that truly if it had not been for Antigone, all would have been at peace. It is clear how he feels about these two values in conflict when encountered in another person, Antigone: However, Antigone went back after his body was uncovered and performed the ritual again, an act that seems to be completely unmotivated by anything other than a plot necessity so that she could be caught in the act of disobedience, leaving no doubt of her guilt.

Even when he is forced to amend his decree to please the gods, he first tends to the dead Polyneices before releasing Antigone. In Sophocles' account, the two brothers agreed to alternate rule each year, but Eteocles decided not to share power with his brother after his tenure expired.

Antigone Ode 2 Summary

Those two lines are so fundamental that the rest of the verse is spent catching up with them. Ismene refuses to help her, not believing that it will actually be possible to bury their brother, who is under guard, but she is unable to stop Antigone from going to bury her brother herself.

Creon is king of Thebes, bound to the duties of rule. The Chorusa group of elderly Theban men, is at first deferential to the king. The chorus is sympathetic to Antigone only when she is led off to her death.

She repeatedly declares that she must act to please "those that are dead" An. Enraged, Creon seizes her arm and twists her to his side. Creon orders Antigone buried alive in a tomb. He orders the guards to uncover the body and keep the matter secret.

Antigone is a tragedy by Sophocles written in or before BC. It is the third of the three Theban plays chronologically, but was the first written. The play expands on the Theban legend that predated it and picks up where Aeschylus' Seven Against Thebes ends.

Antigone picks up in the same (uber-dismal) place that Oedipus at Colonus leaves off. Oedipus has just passed away in Colonus, and Antigone and her sister decide to return to Thebes with the intention of helping their brothers, Eteocles and Polyneices, avoid a prophecy that predicts they will kill each other in a battle for the throne of Thebes.

The Chorus introduces the players. Antigone is the girl who will rise up alone and die young. Haemon, Antigone's dashing fiancé, chats with Ismene, her beautiful sister. Though one would have expected Haemon to go for Ismene, he inexplicably proposed to Antigone on the night of a ball.

Creon is. Antigone rejects her, but she does not deserve to die with her. Ismene swears she will bury Polynices herself then. Antigone calls on Creon to have her arrested, warning him that her disease is catching.

At the end of Oedipus at Colonus, Oedipus has passed douglasishere.comne, knowing that her brothers are waging war against each other in a battle for the throne of Thebes, decides to return to Thebes in order to prevent them from killing each other.

Antigone is the subject of a story in which she attempts to secure a respectable burial for her brother douglasishere.coms's sons, Eteocles and Polynices, had shared the rule jointly until they quarrelled, and Eteocles expelled his brother.

In Sophocles' account, the two brothers agreed to alternate rule each year, but Eteocles decided not to share power with his brother after his tenure expired.

Antigone summary
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